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Choose one of the aphorisms listed above.
Who first wrote/spoke the aphorism or where does it originate?
What does the aphorism mean?
What is the author’s truth?
Why do you agree or disagree with the aphorism and how if at all has it made you rethink what you thought about the topic before researching the aphorism?
How could you apply this “wisdom” to your life?

1. “The rich stay rich by acting poor.
The poor stay poor by acting rich.”
2. “If you want a friend get a dog.”
3. “It takes 20 years to become an overnight success.”
4. “Nothing is certain but death and taxes.”
5. “This too shall pass.”
6. “Trust but verify.”
7. “Genius is one percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.”
8. “Failure to prepare is preparing to fail .”
9. “If you want something done right do it yourself.”
10. “There’s nothing new under the sun.”
11. “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”
12. “Less is more.”
13. “Buy land.
They’re not making it anymore.”
14. “Misery loves company.”
15. “Be careful what you ask for.
You might get it.”
16. “Work smart, not hard.”
17. “To everything there is a season and a time for every purpose under heaven…”
18. “Brevity is the soul of wit.”
19. “A rose by any other name smells as sweet.”
20. “Carpe diem.”
For composition exercises two and three please write:
1. (format) a 500-word composition.
Use Courier New, 12-point font and double space.
2. (content) Your composition needs a main idea, major points and specific details.
Respond to the topic/aphorism in your first paragraph.
Present your main idea in the first paragraph.
Then use the rest of your 500-word limit to support your main idea.
You must cite from the material you’ve read to support your ideas. As Abraham Lincoln wrote, “It is a pleasure to be able to quote lines to fit any occasion.”
Use two-three quotes from the sources in your composition to “fit” your interpretation of the aphorism.
3. (focus) Stay focused on the topic.
Everything you write should have a connection to the topic and your main idea.
4. (clarity) When you proofread check for common errors like fragments, run-on’s, commonly confused words, tense shift, subject-verb disagreement, spelling, etc.
Try to adhere to the KISS Principle.
Keep your sentences short and simple and divide your composition into paragraphs.