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It is very unfortunate that low birth babies affect the family and community. Personally, as a nurse, infants, and babies are my weakness, not my focus of study, and something I do not enjoy. Not to sound harsh, but we all have our preferences as individuals. There are many short and long term impacts, socioeconomic implications, and of course the need for ongoing care. The more premature an infant is at birth will determine the costliness to care for them. Medications, special treatments, and the amount of time spent in the hospital alone can deter the entire family’s road to recovery and the happiness which should be shared when having a newborn. These infants need ongoing care and many times family members end up being their caretakers full time and not working anymore and money can become sparse and the child can then be looked at as a burden. Several comorbidities include hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and increased risk of obesity. (Bowers, 2013) The at-risk group includes black women due to lifestyle and economic factors. The ethnic group opposite of that are Hispanic women. These 2 groups I am very familiar with, however, when it comes to children, I am uneducated. Hopefully, this course will make me more aware.

I am using FAN as my community resource. FAN is committed to providing free (which is of utmost importance) high-quality resources for supporting parents and the family. There is actually a woman who is part of the Family Advisory Staff who give here email. ErikaGoyer@gmail.com This website is so important and easy for all to access, get educated, donate, sponsor, and be a part of this wonderful organization.

(nationalperinatal.org)

Effectiveness is very well received. You can become a member of this group, make donations for families in need, and there are many more ways to simply get involved. You can actually become a sponsor to help other families see and feel what you went through and help all along the way.

REFERENCE:

Bowers, B. (2013). Prenatal, intrapartal, and postpartal risk factors.