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My response – 

  Based on my thoughts on slow and deep reading, I would say that slow reading is the systematic reduction of one’s reading speed to improve comprehension or enjoyment. Slow reading has recently gained popularity due to the slow movement’s focus on decelerating modern life’s pace. The importance of slow and deep reading allows us to see how we are all linked to the world and our own stories as they grow.  We discover our plots and storylines unfolding in others’ language and speech as we read deeply.  However, slow and lingered reading may be caused by deficiencies or deficits in key cognitive processing areas, including processing sounds. Processing of visual knowledge. The things that make sense about these concepts are that slow reading increases one’s focus, decreases your stress levels, and enhances one’s capacity to think, hear, and empathize.

It can encourage, transfer, and change you with deep thinking, and it lasts much longer than light reading. The confusing part about these concepts is that an individual will properly understand the writer’s viewpoints if she reads slowly. Reading quickly increases your pace, though some books are difficult to comprehend when read quickly. Nevertheless, it seems that it does not matter whether you read quickly or slowly. It only depends on the book and the person.  So, one needs to go with the flow and have fun. The parts that seem practical to me are that slow and deep reading makes me think, feel, and teach me a lot about the history of the world and writing. I cannot use the parts with speed reading, saving time, but one does not gain enough knowledge. Reading deep and slowly positively impacts my coursework since it increases my thinking capacity and my knowledge levels grow.

Peers response – 

 Addressing the first bullet in the discussion forum. My understanding of slow deep reading personally is unique. I am a person who personally can’t grasp what I am reading if I read to slowly. I lose focus however, if I read at a medium or fast pace I can get deep and visualize into what I am reading, and connect, or comprehend with what I am reading better. 

In the article, “The Importance of Deep Reading” where it stated,  “An early immersion in reading that is largely online tends to reward certain cognitive skills, such as multitasking, and habituate the learner to immediate information gathering and quick attention shifts, rather than to deep reflection and original thought. The immediacy and volume of available information may well delude new learners into thinking they have what they need to know. From a pedagogical perspective, when information seems so complete, what motivation is there to go beneath and beyond it? From a cognitive neuroscience perspective, the digital culture’s reinforcement of rapid attentional shifts and multiple sources of distraction can short-circuit the development of the slower, more cognitively demanding comprehension processes that go into the formation of deep reading and deep thinking. If such a truncated development occurs, we may be spawning a culture so inured to sound bites and thought bites that it fosters neither critical analysis nor contemplative processes in its members. As technology visionary Edward Tenner (2006) remarked, it would be a shame if the very intellect that created this new technology was threatened by it.” 

I agree with the aspect of it. there was not much with the whole article that was confusing to me.

As far as for me I think though I am going to stay with the SQ3R method I have been using because it seems to be working well with me personally. I personally wouldn’t feel well reading slowly, but I do like to get deep with my reading and have a visual and connection with what I am reading. If I go the slow route I will then start to not comprehend my reading as I would when reading at my normal pace and that would have a bad impact on my coursework. 

  • Read the two different paragraphs above and compare my response to the peers response.
  • To the best of your ability, help your peers with the ideas they found challenging or the reasons they feel they might not use deep reading strategies. If you don’t feel deep reading is practical, explain why you feel that way and how you plan to make the most of your reading.
  • Your response should be at least 100 words each.